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01 Oct 2020

PRESS RELEASE October 2020 Weenect tracker, an educational collar?

Weenect Hall: Hall 8-20 Stand: 7E62
PRESS RELEASE October 2020 Weenect tracker, an educational collar?
Alternatives to electric collars for your dog's well-being Weenec GPS tracker, a gentle training collar?
Alternatives to electric collars for your dog's well-being Weenec GPS tracker, a gentle training collar?

There are three types of electric collars available on the market: anti-bark, buried fences and remote control. These collars meet the needs of the owner but what about the what about the dog's welfare? For several years now, many educators and veterinarians have been alerting us to the widespread use of these collars of these collars and their deleterious consequences on the behaviour of dogs. dogs. Indeed, when they have received a shock, this signal remains engraved in their brain and the dogs, not knowing it, will not be able to respond. brain and the dogs never forget it. Over time, the dog develops anxiety and even aggression. This can also prevent the development of a serene bond with its master. There are many scientific studies on this subject. See in particular the one by Sylvia Masson link However, there are still real needs in terms of dog training. The obvious alternative is of course positive education. Positive education aims at rewarding the animal rather than punishing it. It is about teaching the animal like the rules rather than impose them by fear or force. Neither lax nor authoritarian, positive education is a search for the right balance. The presence of behavioural problems in a dog whose owners apply positive education unsuccessfully apply positive education should lead to medical research to a diagnosis of the behavioural disorder. Unfortunately, this medical option option is still not well known, many dogs are fitted with electric collars in an attempt collars in an attempt to deal with the emergency. Manufacturers are aware of these developments and are offering new products, sprays, ultra sounds, clickers... others rename their range of electric collars to electrostatic... Alternatives to electric collars for your dog's well-being Weenec GPS tracker, a gentle training collar? October 2020 PRESS RELEASE October 2020 Weenect tracker, an educational collar? What do we offer at Weenect? The dog is man's oldest friend, and this extremely strong relationship owes nothing to compulsion. On the other hand, just as a loving parent parent educates his child, an attentive master educates his dog. For Weenect, adding the education function to our geolocation service is an obvious choice. With its vibration and ringing function and its virtual fence service, Weenect is truly the alternative to electric collars. The owner can act remotely on the collar of his dog, he can activate the sensor contained in the tracker and choose the vibration or ringing. The dog then associates the vibration or the ringing with its owner. The use of these tools obviously requires work and patience, but in the medium term it is a guarantee of the dog's safety and well-being. While preserving the quality of the relationship with the owner. Can the Weenect tracker be an effective alternative to electric collars? We asked Dr Sylvia Masson, consultant in veterinary psychiatry and behaviourist and author of a landmark study on electric collars published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior*. • Electric collars are very controversial and may soon be banned, is this a good thing? SM "In the short term there is some effectiveness of electric collars, that's the whole problem, but the invisible long-term damage is terrible and irreversible. I think that anxiety and aggression is the main consequence of using these collars. *To read the studie https://sylvia-masson.com/publicationsinternationales/questionnaire-survey-on-the-use-of-different-e-collar-types-in-france/ • Is it possible to train a pet to recall with a training collar that vibrates and sounds but without pain? SM "Yes, this is already done for deaf dogs in particular. If the dog is able to discriminate between vibration and ringing (which is undoubtedly the case), we can even teach it a different command for each stimulus. • Can we imagine other types of use, such as education on the territory via the virtual fence that notifies the master when the dog leaves? Will he understand without coercive means not to exceed certain limits? SM "It can be done if there is visual recognition (gate/hedge...), the dog must associate the vibration with the recall when it exceeds certain limits or when it crosses certain boundaries of its territory. If the boundary is totally virtual (in the middle of a field) it is not possible...” • Can a training collar help control a dog's barking? Or to distract him from deviant behaviour? SM "We work in disruption, like with compressed air, the fact of interrupting the behaviour without frightening it is the first element. Then you have to associate the vibration with a request so that you can reward as soon as it is carried out. This timing must be precise, otherwise he will very quickly ignore (by hapbituation) the disruptive signal ». • How long would it take for a non-professional handler to get results with his dog? SM "If there are no behavioural problems, if there is good timing! You have to associate a vibration/ringing within a few seconds with a behaviour. 3 to 6 short sessions seems a very reasonable goal.” In summary: - Vibration and ringing can be associated with 2 types of use - In training, timing is essential: when the tracer is activated, the next few seconds must be used to give the dog an indication - During the learning process it is necessary to systematically encourage/reward To go further, Sylvia Masson is also the author of the book G.É.R.E.R l'éducation et le comportement de votre chien

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNDJTL3Oxd8&list=PLoF5GgP7zJjTEgqm9V_vHD7-v23awlNG1
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